YTD Performance of Equity Factors – Update After Two Months

15.May 2020

Nearly two months ago, in a time of the highest turmoil during the current pandemic crisis, we performed a quick assessment of the status of performance of equity factor strategies. The world has still not been able to ward-off health-care crisis completely, but a lot of countries have made significant progress (on the other hand, there are still a lot of countries in a worse state than a few months ago). Equity indexes have rebounded from the March lows and have removed some of the losses. Therefore, we have received multiple inquiries about the current situation of equity factor strategies.

So it may be a good time to revisit once again how they are performing.

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Alternative Data Screener on Quantpedia

11.May 2020

Global interest in alternative datasets is growing strongly. We at Quantpedia are looking on this emerging trend with curiosity too.

We are happy to announce Quantpedia’s cooperation with DDQIR, an alternative data-driven quantitative research company, which maintains an extensive database of alternative data providers. Their PHUMA Platform contains information about the majority of available alternative datasets and detailed characterization offers the possibility for the in-depth data-discovery process. DDQIR will operate a simplified demo of their tool for us on a separate Quantpedia’s sub-page.

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Backtesting ESG Factor Investing Strategies

7.May 2020

Socially Responsible Investing (also called ESG Factor Investing) grows in popularity. More and more investors enter the stock market not just to invest their savings, but they are also want to support companies that bring positive social or environmental change. ESG factor investing can bring satisfaction to those investors. But does it also brings a real outperformance in a financial sense? Is there some ESG factor alpha? How big is it? These are some of the questions we have decided to investigate – we obtained data, identified ESG factor strategies and tested them. Feel free to explore them with us…

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Quantpedia in April 2020

2.May 2020

April was more business-as-usual month for Quantpedia team as eleven new Quantpedia Premium strategies have been added into our database, and six new related research papers have been included in existing Premium strategies during last month.

Additionally, we have produced 17 new backtests written in QuantConnect code. Our database currently contains over 270 strategies with out-of-sample backtests/codes.

Also, five new blog posts you may find interesting have been published on our Quantpedia blog:

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A Link Between Investment Biases and Cortisol and Testosterone Levels

28.April 2020

Financial markets are full of pricing anomalies, and their existence is often explained by human behavior. Behavioral finance postulates that cognitive irrationality is manifested in biases like the disposition effect (the tendency of people to sell assets that have increased in value, but keeping assets that have dropped in value in portfolio) or overconfidence bias (the tendency of people to be more confident in their own abilities). There are some papers which directly link investment decision making caused by these biases to actual physiology of investors (for example, a known impact of testosterone on investment performance). A new research paper written by Nofsinger, Patterson, and Shank examines not only testosterone but also cortisol levels of testing subjects and then compares their performance in a mock investment contest. Both hormones are strongly related to higher portfolio turnover and inability to accept losses, with cortisol levels even more significant than testosterone.

Author: Nofsinger, Patterson, Shank

Title: On the Physiology of Investment Biases: The Role of Cortisol and Testosterone

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Secular Decline in Yields around FOMC Meetings

24.April 2020

Federal Open Market Committee meetings (aka FED meetings) have a significant influence on the number of different assets (see for example our article related to drift in equities during FED meetings). The main channel which FED uses to influence the US economy is the level of short term interest rates. Therefore, it’s not a surprise that FED meetings have influence also on long-term interest rates. But just how big? Bigger than most people think. We are presenting one interesting research paper written by Sebastian Hillenbrand, which shows that the whole secular decline in equity yields and long-term interest rates since 1980 was realized entirely in a 3-day window around FOMC meetings. Now, that’s called the influence …

Author: Hillenbrand

Title: The Secular Decline in Long-Term Yields around FOMC Meetings

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