How to Replicate Any Portfolio

2.November 2022

Would you like to see the performance of your portfolio 100 years back in history? Do you want to analyze the risk of your strategy under 100 years of real historical scenarios? All of these, and much more, will be soon (in a few days) available for Quantpedia Pro subscribers. How? We will explain today how we can model a 100-year history of your portfolio.

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Introducing Quantpedia Answers

26.October 2022

Approximately 18 months ago, when we started Quantpedia Pro service, we promised to systematically expand its analytical capabilities by adding new tools and reports to it. We kept this promise and enlarged Quantpedia Pro to over 30 reports with hundreds of tables and charts. Factor regression analysis, risk scenarios, seasonality analysis, alternative weighting schemes, risk parity, CPPI, volatility targeting, correlation analysis, Markowitz portfolio optimization, clustering, market phases analysis, ETF replication etc. offer insight into the matters of portfolio construction or risk management. But our disciplined tempo also means that some users can become lost in the number of tools Quantpedia Pro offers. Therefore, we would like to introduce to you our new Quantpedia Answers section, which contains practical examples of how to use the growing capabilities of Quantpedia Pro reporting.

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The Role of Interest Rates in Factor Discovery

24.October 2022

Over the past several decades, economists and quantitative scientists found a very large number of asset pricing anomalies and published numerous research papers about their findings, and this is known in the financial jargon as “factor zoo.” However, one strong underlying force might drive the performance of many of those anomalies. What’s that force? The level and trend in the interest rates, as in almost all parts of the developed world, there was a long-term steady decline in rates and inflation for nearly 40 years. We use the past tense as it seems that the situation changed at the beginning of this year…

Van Binsbergen, Jules H. and Ma, Liang and Schwert, Michael (Sep 2022) touched on this subject and made a careful examination of both past factor research and found that a significant part of published papers and developed models are sometimes unknowingly exposed to fitting to low or even zero interest rates.

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Stock-Bond Correlation, an In-Depth Look

19.October 2022

The recent surge in global inflation sent shock waves across financial markets and affected the complicated relationship between stocks and bonds. Today, we would like to present you with a review of two interesting papers, which provide both a deep and easy-to-understand examination of the correlation structure of those two main asset classes. The first paper reviews specifics in various parts of the world, and the second one summarizes known information about the macroeconomic drivers of the US stock-bond correlation.

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Are FOMC Announcements Really Informative?

14.October 2022

Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) of Fed (Federal Reserve Board/System) meetings which bring announcements usually followed by press conferences are one of the most important events in the rich calendar of investors’ watch lists. They are always closely watched for possible trading opportunities and are full of volatile moves on both long and short sides in fronts of all asset classes ranging from forex, bonds, and equities to nowadays even crypto markets. In our today’s summary, we will take a closer look at some implications that those kinds of financial phenomena bring.

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How to Improve Post-Earnings Announcement Drift with NLP Analysis

11.October 2022

Post–earnings-announcement drift (abbr. PEAD) is a well-researched phenomenon that describes the tendency for a stock’s cumulative abnormal returns to drift in the direction of an earnings surprise for some time (several weeks or even several months) following an earnings announcement. There have been many explanations for the existence of this phenomenon. One of the most widely accepted explanations for the effect is that investors under-react to the earnings announcements. Although we already addressed such an effect in some of our previous articles and strategies, we now present a handy method of improving the PEAD by using linguistic analysis of earnings call transcripts.

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